Solid Oak: Furniture To Love For Life

The robust nature of oak, together with its individuality and character, mean this magnificent wood has an appeal that’s timeless. Carefully crafted, with longevity and durability crucial to each design, we pride ourselves on offering customers beautifully stylish furniture that endures too.

From marital beds, cots and well-loved sofas to the conversations, celebrations and decisions big and small that are made around the dining table, we like to think our furniture plays a part in creating precious memories. Appreciating there’s something truly special in the potential for provenance oak provides, we love the idea that, if cared for properly, our furniture and the stories that become tied to it, will live on for generations.

With this in mind, we’ve put together a guide with expert advice on how best to care for oak and hold onto the unique character of your furniture.

CARING FOR OAK FURNITURE

Choose Furniture Crafted From Kiln Dried Wood

The first thing you should do to preserve the beauty of the oak pieces you’ve chosen, is to make sure that the timber has been meticulously kiln dried. The weight of freshly sawn wood is almost 50% water so this process means moisture levels are spot on.

oak furniture

Wax Regularly

Your furniture’s best friend, wax polish will nourish the timbers and create a protective seal to maintain the wood’s optimum levels of moisture. Nurturing the grain in this way also helps the wood resist cracking.

If you’re applying a new or different wax, we would always recommend sampling it on the underside of the furniture so you can check you are entirely happy with how it looks.

In our opinion, Beeswax gives the best finish. Here are three simple steps to follow to ensure excellent protection while minimising streaking and air pockets:

  1. Apply the wax using a soft cloth, moving it in the same direction as the grain.
  2. Leave for five minutes.
  3. Remove residual wax by buffing and, as before, follow the direction of the grain.

rustic solid oak sideboard

Positioning Your Furniture

To promote airflow and maintain a stable temperature for the oak, leave a gap of about 25mm between the furniture and the wall.

Avoid putting your furniture in front of a radiator or air conditioning unit: the fluctuations in temperature will parch the wood which could lead to the joints in the furniture moving apart. Conservatories also experience similar extremes in heat, so save your oak furniture for other spaces in your home.

If you are repositioning your furniture, always lift it carefully so you don’t damage the structure of the piece. Solid wood floors can be protected by placing felt pads on the base of the feet of your furniture.

Sunlight

Oak furniture will grow in beauty and will naturally darken as it ages but try to avoid direct sunlight which will dramatically fade the finish.  Regular daylight will also alter the colour, however occasionally rearranging any ornaments, vases and lamps should help to ensure even wear and colouring.

oak furniture land living room

Cleaning Your Oak Furniture

Oak is porous so any liquid that comes into contact with the wood is easily absorbed. Spillages will lead to staining, particularly coffee and red wine, so quickly blot the area with a clean, soft cloth that’s dampened slightly with water.

If the wood has stubborn staining, contact a professional furniture restorer who will have the tools and expertise to return your furniture to its former glory.

When it comes to regular cleaning, household products can potentially damage the furniture’s finish so we advise keeping it simple using a clean, damp cloth to wipe and dust surfaces.

Shop our range of real hardwood furniture here.

If you have any lovely oak furniture that makes you love your home, we’d love to see it! Send us your snaps using the hashtag #LoveYourHome and we’ll feature our favourite posts on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

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